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Pupil Premium

What is Pupil Premium?

 

The pupil premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers.

“Pupil premium funding is available to both mainstream and non-mainstream schools, such as special schools and pupil referral units. It is paid to schools according to the number of pupils who have been:

  • registered as eligible      for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years
  • been in care for 6 months      or longer

 

 

A pdf copy of this year's plan can be found at the bottom of this page. 

 

 Pupil premium strategy statement – Ridgeway Primary Academy

  1. Summary information

School

Ridgeway Primary Academy

Academic Year

2020-21

Total PP budget

£319,000

Date of most recent PP Review

Sept. 2020

Total number of pupils

438

Number of pupils eligible for PP

276

Date for next internal review of this strategy

March 2021

 

2. Current attainment

 

Pupils eligible for PP (your school)

Pupils not eligible for PP (national average 2019)

% achieving expected standard in reading, writing and maths

57%

70%

% achieving expected standard in reading

62%

80%

% achieving expected standard in writing

57%

83%

% achieving expected standard in maths

62%

81%

 

3. Barriers to future attainment (for pupils eligible for PP, including high ability)

 In-school barriers (issues to be addressed in school, such as poor oral language skills)

       A. 

Speech and Language issues across school, especially in Early Years, means children do not make the early progress they should.

       B.

Mobility of children into Ridgeway. Significant numbers of children join school mid-year, often following a period of instability at a previous school, disproportionately eligible for PP.

C.

Children on PP have disproportionately not accessed online learning during the pandemic, causing gaps in learning at school.

External barriers (issues which also require action outside school, such as low attendance rates)

D.

Attendance, specifically persistent absenteeism, needs to improve – especially for disadvantaged children.

E.

Move to online learning disproportionately less effective for pupils on PP.

4. Desired outcomes

 

 

Desired outcomes and how they will be measured

Success criteria

 

A.

Speech and Language issues are identified and addressed quickly to ensure that, where possible, progress is not hampered. Measured through impact assessment of SALT interventions and subsequent improved progress in class.

Children in Early Years make accelerated progress towards age expectations.

 

B.

The needs of children who join Ridgeway mid-year are assessed quickly and provision, including from the Inclusion Team, is tailored to best support them. Evidenced through discussion with staff and monitored through behaviour tracking.

Increase in numbers does not lead to an increase in rate of sanction. Learning remains focussed and progress is good for all pupils.

 

C.

 

Children who are identified as requiring support to enable them to catch up lost learning close the academic gap on their peers in the areas that have been identified. This will be tracked through use of Rising Stars online assessment system at 3 further data points across the year.

Following intervention, identified children evidence in tests that they have recovered or bettered their pre-lockdown attainment in comparison with age-expectations.

 

D.

 

Attendance, specifically persistent absenteeism, improves, particularly among pupils eligible for PP. Measured through attendance tracking systems.

Attendance improves to 96%.

 

E.

Children engage with online learning during any isolation or partial lockdown in order to ensure continuity in the curriculum and minimal interruptions to progress. This is shown through children’s attendance at online sessions and their submission of work, tracked by SLT.

Most children engage with online learning immediately. Those experiencing technical or circumstantial difficulties are supported to access learning, leading to rising engagement numbers.

 

         

 

5. Planned expenditure

Academic year

 

The three headings below enable schools to demonstrate how they are using the pupil premium to improve classroom pedagogy, provide targeted support and support whole school strategies.

i) Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action / approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Speech and Language issues are identified and addressed quickly to ensure that, where possible, progress is not hampered.

  • Speech and Language Consultant working in school 1 day per week to coordinate provision. (£15k)
  • Staff training enables use of SALT strategies such as Colourful Semantics in usual classroom practice, particularly in EYFS and KS1. (£3k)
  • DAPs have higher SALT needs that non-DAP.
  • Close monitoring of provision over the last year has evidenced effectiveness, including significant improvement of expressive language in Reception from initial screening rates of 46% subnormal.
  • Regular meetings and scrutiny of Speech and Language provision from Metis Therapy.
  • Evidence trails through school identify and address any areas for development.

Head of School

SENDCo

  • Half termly meetings with Metis Therapy.
  • Regular (at least half termly) evidence trails.

Children’s personal, social and emotional development is prioritised and supported.

  • Enhanced PSHE offer, including Farm Schools and Kidsafe, support the social and emotional needs of children, including those who are new to Ridgeway. (£65k)
  • Building on work by Mel McCree on the impacts of Forest School, Ridgeway has developed a carefully targeted and sequenced programme focusing on: resilience and self-regulation; emotional expression; choice and independence; and teamwork.
  • The programme has been working for several years and benefits have been noted.
  • Regular monitoring from Farm Schools Lead.
  • Focused partnership with staff at Jarrow Hall to revisit curriculum regularly and continue to improve.

Farm Schools Lead

Head of School

  • Termly.

Children engage with online learning during any isolation or partial lockdown in order to ensure continuity in the curriculum and minimal interruptions to progress

  • Training of all staff in Google Classroom. (£1k)
  • Investment in Chromebooks to be loaned out to all children who do not have the technology to access the internet at home. (£30k)
  • Investment in internet connectivity dongles for children unable to access the internet. (£1k)
  • EEF’s ‘Guide to Supporting School Planning: a Tiered Approach to 2020-21’, notes that, ‘Ensuring access to technology is key, particularly for disadvantaged pupils
  • Class teachers to monitor engagement in remote learning and ICT issues to be addressed.

Alastair Storey (AHT)

  • Weekly during situations where remote learning is utilised.

Total budgeted cost

£105,000

ii) Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Children who are not meeting age-related expectations are supported through small group teaching and targeted interventions.

  • Use of apprentice teaching assistants to support children in class and deliver targeted intervention. ((£15k)
  • TAs and HLTAs used to deliver complex and group interventions as needed. (£60k)
  • NFER indicates that paired or small group additional teaching had an impact of 18.8%
  • Apprentice TA training
  • Regular scrutiny
  • Impact statements based on pupil observations and data analysis

Head of School

Termly

All social, emotional and mental health needs are supported, including to parents and families.

  • Inclusion Manager employed to coordinate provision and work with parents. (£35k)
  • New HLTA employed with specific responsibility for coordinating support for SE&MH. (£30k)
  • Ridgeway’s Inclusion Offer has grown over the last 3 years and new children have been well-supported, evidenced through the integration of 72 new pupils during 2017/18 academic year; 55 in 2018/19; and 35 in 2019/20.
  • Regular Inclusion Team Meetings
  • Monitoring of behaviour systems

Head of School

2 weekly Inclusion Team Meetings.

Speech and Language issues are identified and addressed quickly to ensure that, where possible, progress is not hampered.

  • 2 x equivalent full time teaching assistants delivering SALT interventions. (£60K)

 

  • DAPs have higher SALT needs that non-DAP.
  • Close monitoring of provision over the last year has evidenced effectiveness, including significant improvement of expressive language in Reception from initial screening rates of 46% subnormal.
  • Regular meetings and scrutiny of Speech and Language provision from Metis Therapy.
  • Evidence trails through school identify and address any areas for development.

Head of School

SENDCo

  • Half termly meetings with Metis Therapy.

Regular (at least half termly) evidence trails.

Total budgeted cost

£200,000

iii) Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

What is the evidence and rationale for this choice?

How will you ensure it is implemented well?

Staff lead

When will you review implementation?

Effective mental health support for all children, including those new to Ridgeway

  • Embedding of Place2Be in school for 2 full days per week. (£25k)

 

  • Place2Be are the country’s leading providers of mental health support for children in schools with an extensive evidence base.
  • Monitored through regular inclusion team meetings.

SENDCo

Deputy Head

Termly

Children have a positive start to their day.

  • A free Breakfast Club is accessed by over 100 pupils across school, staffed by the school. (£30k)
  • Research by IFS researchers in collaboration with the National Children’s Bureau found that offering disadvantaged primary school children a free, before-school breakfast club can improve pupils’ academic attainment.
  • Monitored by Inclusion Manager and HLTA.
  • Regular monitoring by SLT.

Inclusion Manager

Half Termly meetings with Inclusion Manager.

Attendance is monitored and families supported to ensure reduction in absenteeism

  • Inclusion Manager employed to coordinate provision and work with parents. (£ As above)
  • Ridgeway’s Inclusion Manager has ensured improved attendance year on year since employment
  • Regular Inclusion Team Meetings

Head of School

2 weekly Inclusion Team Meetings.

Total budgeted cost

£55,000

6. Review of expenditure

Previous Academic Year

 

i. Quality of teaching for all

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Children eligible for PP in Y6 achieve 75% for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar

  • Reduce class size and increase adult support
  • Additional one to one reading for less able readers 4 times per week, including support for SPaG
  • Data tracking meetings analyse the performance of all groups of children half termly

At time of lockdown, Y6 were predicted to get 63% for Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar. This was an increase of 16% on the previous year.

Approaches were effective to point of lockdown.

 

Reduction in class size not possible in 2020/21 due to use of bubbles and larger Year 6 cohort.

£180,000

To ensure quality first teaching for all by continuing to provide high quality, focused CPD

Staff training:

  • Staff meetings
  • Triads (peer-to-peer observed sessions)
  • Evidence trails.
  • Intervention training.

Monitoring showed teaching as good and CPD supported the drive for continued improvement. Full impact not able to be evidenced due to lockdown.

This will continue to be a key strategy for driving progress.

Children with delays in speech and language are effectively supported through early identification and intervention

  • Speech and Language Consultant working in school 1 day per week to coordinate provision.
  • 1½ full time teaching assistants delivering SALT interventions.

Caseload significantly reduced in Autumn and early Spring Term in EYFS through targeted support. Full year’s progress was not measurable due to lockdown. The reduction in case numbers as children progress through the school evidences effective practice.

This continues to be an effective strategy and a key part of Ridgeway’s offer. We will also use NELI in 2020/21 to support children’s SALT in Reception.

ii. Targeted support

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Children who are not meeting age-related expectations are supported through targeted interventions.

  • Use of apprentice teaching assistants to support children in class and deliver targeted intervention.
  • TAs and HLTAs used to deliver complex and group interventions as needed.

Impact assessments from interventions delivered in Autumn Term evidenced improvements.

Evidence unavailable for Risings Stars assessments as no further testing was completed due to lockdown.

Interventions across all areas will continue to be delivered on the basis of need.

The use of Mathletics as an intervention was not effective and the Maths Lead will work with SENDCo to identify more effective support for children with SEN in the area of maths.

£60,000

All social, emotional and mental health needs are coordinated to offer appropriate support where needed, including to parents and families.

  • Inclusion Manager employed to coordinate provision and work with parents.
  • New HLTA employed with specific responsibility for coordinating support for SE&MH.

Inclusion Manager has supported all CP/CIN and non-SEND Early Help cases across the year with positive impact on children. Inclusion Manager supported children and families effectively through lockdown. HLTA is now trained in many areas to support mental health.

The Inclusion Manager continues to be an effective part of our support for children and their families.

HLTA is now trained and delivering a range of SE&MH support across the school.

iii. Other approaches

Desired outcome

Chosen action/approach

Estimated impact: Did you meet the success criteria? Include impact on pupils not eligible for PP, if appropriate.

Lessons learned

(and whether you will continue with this approach)

Cost

Effective mental health support for all children, including those new to Ridgeway

Embedding of Place2Be in school for 2 full days per week.

18 children supported through direct counselling. Many more supported through Time to Talk, group and class sessions. This did not continue effectively through lockdown.

This approach will continue with wider focus on working with parents in order to provide parenting support.

£35,000

Attendance is monitored and families supported to ensure reduction in absenteeism

Inclusion Manager employed to coordinate provision and work with parents.

At time of lockdown, attendance for 2019/20 was improved on the previous 3 years. Inclusion Manager supported safeguarding of vulnerable families through lockdown.

Inclusion Manager will continue to operate in the role of Attendance Lead.

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